Scientific research on the Bonapace Method

The Bonapace Method is based on comprehensive scientific research on non-pharmacological pain management. These studies have been peer-reviewed. We invite you to consult and download these scientific articles, and to cite them where appropriate.

Evaluation of the Bonapace Method: a specific educational intervention to reduce pain during childbirth.

Evaluation of the Bonapace Method: a specific educational intervention to reduce pain during childbirth. 

Bonapace, J., Chaillet, N., Gaumond, I., Paul-Savoie, E., & Marchand, S. (2013) – Journal of pain research, 6, 653–661. 

This article compares the Bonapace method with traditional prenatal classes and describes how it helps to reduce the intensity and unpleasantness of childbirth pain by almost 50%.

The significant differences in pain perception between traditional prenatal classes and the Bonapace Method suggest that the emphasis on pain modulation models and techniques during labour, combined with the active participation of a partner in the Bonapace Method, are important variables to add to traditional birth preparation programs for pain management during childbirth.

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Nonpharmacologic Approaches for Pain Management During Labor Compared with Usual Care: A Meta-Analysis

Nonpharmacologic Approaches for Pain Management During Labor Compared with Usual Care: A Meta-Analysis

Nils Chaillet PhD,  Loubna Belaid MSc,  Chantal Crochetière MD,  Louise Roy MD,  Guy-Paul Gagné MD,  Jean Marie Moutquin MD,  Michel Rossignol MD,  Marylène Dugas PhD,  Maggy Wassef MSc,  Julie Bonapace Med – Birth 41:2 June 2014

This high-quality meta-analysis of 57 randomized controlled trials uses the Bonapace method of classifying non-pharmacological techniques. 

According to this study, certain non-pharmacological approaches to pain relief in labour, when used as part of the hospital’s pain management strategies, reduce all medical interventions, including caesarean sections, epidurals and the need to induce labour without causing harm to women and their children.

According to the study, the mother’s psychological state is the best predictor of birth outcome. When the mother feels confident, she has a more pleasant and safer experience. 

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Fondements physiologiques de la douleur pendant le travail et l’accouchement: approche de soulagement basée sur les données probantes

No. 355-Physiologic Basis of Pain in Labour and Delivery: An Evidence-Based Approach to its Management

Julie Bonapace, MEd, Guy-Paul Gagné, MD, Nils Chaillet, PhD, Raymonde Gagnon, PhD; s.-f. aut., Emmanuelle Hébert, s.-f. aut.; MSc, Sarah Buckley, MB ChB –  Directive Clinique de la SOGC

Julie Bonapace is the principal author of this paper, written for the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada, which defines the golden rules of pain management for hospitals and healthcare providers across Canada.

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Effects of non-pharmacological coping strategies for reducing labor pain: A systematic review and network meta-analysis

Effects of non-pharmacological coping strategies for reducing labor pain: A systematic review and network meta-analysis

Chang CY, Gau ML, Huang CJ, Cheng Hm (2022) – PLOS ONE 17(1): e0261493.

Non-pharmacological coping strategies can reduce labour pain while maintaining an effective and satisfactory delivery experience. This systematic review, by synthesizing the body of evidence, demonstrated that non-pharmacological coping strategies are effective in reducing labour pain.

Furthermore, as demonstrated in the network meta-analysis, the Bonapace Method, modulating birth pain by involving the father, is the most effective non-pharmacological intervention for reducing labour pain.

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